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The Trackless Wasteland known as: The MIDDLE

-----Original Message-----
The middle (of a story) KILLS me. I freeze when I have to decide which way things are going to go, and how, and that happens during the middle for me.
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-----Original Message-----
Middle, middle, middle... It's the Slough of Despond!
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-----Original Message-----
The Middle is where I usually fizzle out.
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The middle is DANGEROUS territory.

Why? Because the Middle of a story is where you have a million-and-one options, a million-and-one directions to choose from, and a million-and-one ways to really show off your writing skills.

The Middle is also, where you have a million-and-one opportunities to really screw up your story for good. Opportunities that will send you spiraling into ever tightening circles that eventually jam you into a corner you can't get out of. In short: get you Lost in your own story.

You KNOW you're Lost when you hit that point where you're not sure what to do next. Details and points of logic start tripping you up. Characters, situations, and points of view start evolving all by themselves. They can be fun and often fascinating, but for some reason, they never bring you anywhere close to where you plan to End.

You did plan an End right?

The #1 Reason why writers lose themselves in the Middle is because they started writing without a solid idea of exactly where they wanted to END. Basically, they plunked themselves down in front of their word processor and started writing -- and that's it. No plot, no plan, no outline, and no clue about what direction they wanted their story to go in. AKA: Writing by the Seat of their Pants.

The Fastest way out of any wasteland, especially a bogged down Middle, is Choose a Destination -- an END. Once you've figured out where you want to go, break out your trusty roadmap to figure out where you are and what major highways are closest to you that will take you there.

Simple, no?

Actually no, it's Not Simple. In fact, it's very often PAINFUL. Choosing a destination when you're already halfway through often means hacking out huge reams of text you've spent days, weeks, or months on simply because that stuff is no longer relevant to the End you have in mind.

So what do you do with all that text you no longer need? You SAVE it as its own document and use it later for its own story -- a story you WILL have an end for before you begin this time, right?

"But what if it's already posted, like on a story site?"
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
There's a reason I only post when I know the end is in sight -- but that's me. In cases like this, I advise Finishing the story COMPLETELY -- without posting! Then repost the whole thing in one shot. Basically, tear the whole thing down and repost the whole thing back up in one night.

And for God's sake, don't post a public apology! No one wants to read that crap! They're there to read a Story. They could care less about how the author pissed themselves. If someone asks, answer privately and discreetly.

Okay, here are some ways to get through the MIDDLE -- before it gets You.


The Confrontation
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This is the huge dramatic Confrontation with plenty of special effects and narrow escapes that happens right at the very end of the Middle. The fallout from the glorious Middle event uncovers special powers, and secrets such as the Master Bad Guy, which kicks the story straight toward the climactic end.  

This type of Middle is most often seen in high adventure stories and comic books.

Just about every comic-book movie that's come out has a huge Middle Confrontation that forces the main character to use their Special Powers. This invariably brings them to be noticed by the Master Bad Guy, which in turn heads them straight toward the movie's climactic battle.


The Mini Arc
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
A Mini Arc is a whole little storyline of its own plopped smack in the Middle. It's connected to the main story, but the focus shifts onto a different set of circumstances and characters. It's a little story wholly contained in the Middle designed to expose characters and situations that are vaguely relevant to the main plot.

The Mini Arc is actually something of an antique style. It was very common in the turn of the century stories, but not used much in modern tales as it takes an awful lot of attention away from the main characters.

Jane Austin's romances all have a central Mini Arc where another whole set of characters goes through their own romantic adventure with the main characters only slightly involved. JRR Tolkien's Lord of the Rings series was pretty much a whole pile of Mini Arcs threaded together.


Suddenly Sub-Plot
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The Sudden Subplot is a watered-down version of the Mini-Arc. It's a situation that suddenly develops and has to be dealt with without actually being a major part of the story. Contained completely in the Middle, the Sudden Subplot generally introduces you to some new characters and/or a new threat. Once that's solved, the main character leaves those characters and that situation behind to go on with the rest of the story.

The Star Wars movies ALL had a Sudden Subplot jammed in the middle, the most infamous of the lot being the Pod Race in The Phantom Menace.


Comic Relief
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Right there in the Middle, a flamboyant new supporting character tromps out onto the stage. They only have cameo shots elsewhere in the story, but in the Middle they take over to add important information and/or tools that kick the main characters straight for the Climax in the most entertaining fashion possible.

Traditionally they're known as the Comic Relief character and most often seen in old-time theater and older movies.

Edna Mode of The Incredibles is one of the more obvious of these characters. Another example would be the mechanical genius that supplies James Bond with cool new gadgets right there in the center of the movie.

In the old Abbot and Costello movies, the Middle is where Costello has a whole scene to himself where in his fumbling he discovers who the real bad guys are, ends up knowing a vital piece of information, or accidentally gains the missing object that everyone is looking for -- though no one believes him.


The Reversal
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The Reversal is where the Worst Possible Scenario happens and everything goes to hell in a hand-basket. Basically, the main characters make it to their goal -- only to have their hard won victory snatched right out of their hands.

The Reversal is damned near trademark for the Indiana Jones movies. Every single success that Indy has is not only taken from him it triggers a situation that he barely escapes with his life. Not that any of that stops him from trying again and again...

This type of Middle is most commonly seen in Horror stories where the monster is successfully killed only he's not dead, or captured only to have him escape. Only now, the monster is pissed off and goes directly after the main characters leading straight to the Climax.


In Conclusion...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The Middle can be the most horrifying part of your story to deal with, but if you PLAN for it, the Middle can become the central Masterpiece that makes the whole thing worth reading.

The methods I've listed are best chosen during the planning stages of your story, but they can be applied after the fact with just as much success -- as long as you don't mind taking a hack saw to your story.

Enjoy!
The Middle can be the most horrifying part of your story to deal with -- but if you PLAN for it, the Middle can become the central Masterpiece that makes the whole thing worth reading.

The methods I've listed are best chosen during the planning stages of your story, but they can be applied after the fact with just as much success -- as long as you don't mind taking a hacksaw to your story.


DISCLAIMER: As with all advice, take what you can use and throw out the rest. As a multi-published author, I have been taught some fairly rigid rules on what is publishable and what is not. If my rather straight-laced (and occasionally snotty,) advice does not suit your creative style, by all means, IGNORE IT.

Ookami Kasumi
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Looking for more Writing Tips & Tricks?
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:iconkaykao:
Kaykao Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Wonderful advice! I love all your tutorials, you're very good at explaining things clearly. I may not use every one, but they definitely help bring different perspectives to light.

I definitely fall into the middle trap, most of the time because of the millions of possibilities. I get stuck at the beginning sometimes for the same reason! One recurring problem I seem to have is that (to use a metaphor I recall you using) the alligators I throw in the boat are all clones... I try throwing in something to make things happen, but then realise I've already done that a few times before in the same story and it must be getting tedious by now. Sigh.

This time though, I have planned my ending, so hopefully planning out my middle won't be such a struggle. I know how my characters need to change to get there, I just can't figure out what conflicts to throw that will get them there. But I suppose that's just one of the things you have to wrack your brains over if you're ever going to get it done.

I'm getting off track. Thank you again for all your lovely tips. :)
Reply
:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2014  Professional Writer
Getting your characters to change can be quite a problem. However, as with all problems in writing, I prefer to CHEAT!

First figure out what the Character's main Problem IS:
 -- A Physical Flaw?
 -- A shortage of talent in a given area?
 -- A Personality flaw?
 -- An Emotional Flaw?

If it's a Physical or Talent flaw, those can be fixed with some Training.
 -- If they're bullied into said training that can be quite entertaining to write, and read.

Personality and Emotional flaws however, take a bit of Research -- Psychological Research.

First, identify the specific problem:
 -- Anxiety?
 -- Narcissism?
 -- Obsessive Compulsive Disorder?
 -- Fear of heights?
 -- Fear of small furry critters?
 -- Fear of Commitment?
 -- Fear of Women? (Have you considered writing yaoi?)

Then go to Google.com and find a psychology site. Once there Look Up the Problem and see what they have to say about Fixing it. Apply that to your story.

Then look up: Stages of Grief. That will be the Character Arc you'll need to map out the Fix.

This trick has worked wonders for my stories.
Reply
:iconsilvertsubasa45:
SilverTsubasa45 Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
This is really helpful! I'm just about to enter the middle of one of my stories, and I DO NOT want to get lost in my own story!

I like the bit near the beginning, where you go "Characters, situations and points of view start evolving all by themselves. They can be fun and often fascinating, but...never bring you anywhere close to where you plan to End.

You did plan an End right?" For some reason I can see you saying that last bit in total seriousness, having waited a moment.
Reply
:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2014  Professional Writer
For some reason I can see you saying that last bit in total seriousness, having waited a moment.
That's exactly right! LOL!
Reply
:iconoldsoul-mira:
Oldsoul-Mira Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2014  Student General Artist
I have never, ever finished a long story before. Short stories, yes, but in long stories, I have never even gotten past an outline. why? because I get sucked into the Quicksand of Possibilities in between the beginning and the end.
but this...this I shall worshipWorship

I especially like the Reversal idea. Watch out my character-children; i'm coming for you evil plotting 
 
Reply
:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2014  Professional Writer
LOL!
 -- Have fun torturing your characters! I'm glad I could provide some inspiration.
Reply
:iconsimplysloane:
SimplySloane Featured By Owner Mar 13, 2014
Thanks for this! Your tutorials help so much; they've improved my writing style, plot and character development, and I can't thank you enough! I truly do hope that you have a successful writing career!
Reply
:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2014  Professional Writer
I do have a successful writing career, thanks!
 -- And I'm glad the essays are proving helpful.
Reply
:icon1st-hashirama-senju:
1st-Hashirama-Senju Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2014

This is helpful advice.


For one of my long stories, I am making an outline, since it is going to be long and I do not want to get stuck in the trackless wasteland known as The Middle. And I know how I want it to end, so I will less likely get stuck in the middle like so many do.

Reply
:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2014  Professional Writer
The secret to never getting stuck is simply knowing where you want to end up.
 -- Yet, soooooo many people just can't seem to figure this out. (face-palm)
Reply
:icon1st-hashirama-senju:
1st-Hashirama-Senju Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2014
True.


I have seen many Naruto stories get stuck in the Chūnin Exams and never be continued.


They need to follow your advice about the trackless wasteland; it’s a desert worse than the Land of Wind desert and Sahara desert put together. Those who cross need a plan to get across.

Reply
:iconempresstuila:
EmpressTuiLa Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
*applauds* This is absolutely brilliant!!
Reply
:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Sep 9, 2012  Professional Writer
I'm glad you liked it!
-- I hope it proves useful too. :)
Reply
:iconempresstuila:
EmpressTuiLa Featured By Owner Sep 9, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
Yes it does, thank you!
Reply
:iconhikarisakura1818:
HikariSakura1818 Featured By Owner Jun 16, 2012
These tutorials have taught me more than my writing professors. So thank you! <3
Reply
:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2012  Professional Writer
Well, the first thing anyone should ask of a writing instructor is: "How many books have you published, and were they Fiction or Non-fiction?"

Sadly, most schools look at what sort of degrees a teacher has earned when they really ought to be asking, "What sort of Experience do you have in this subject?"

Just so you know, I've published over 30 titles, all of them Fiction. This is where all my advice comes from; personal experience -- and I am STILL learning new things about my craft.

I'm glad you like my tutorials.
Reply
:iconalorathedragon:
AloratheDragon Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Wow, I wish I had found this sooner! I just hit that horrifying Middle lock-up in a story I'd been writing, and simply can't decide where to go next. I have an ending planned, but there needs to be development of both characters and plot in between. Any tips, or is this just one where I set it aside until I find inspiration?
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:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Aug 3, 2011  Professional Writer
I just hit that horrifying Middle lock-up in a story ... there needs to be development of both characters and plot in between.

That's simple enough. Throw more alligators into the boat.
-- In other words, have something happen to your characters to push them into revealing more of who they are, what they can do, and how they think. If they have special talents THIS is where they should show them off. This is also where their personal problems, hang-ups, denial issues, phobias, and quirks should be revealed -- and that they really need to work on them.
Reply
:iconmiyaoka:
Miyaoka Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2010   Digital Artist
This is so helpful! I hit some random inspiration for a story earlier today. I outlined a great beginning, but once it was time to do the middle, my mind went completely blank!
Reply
:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2010  Professional Writer
Excellent!
-- I love being helpful.
Reply
:icongolgorrrath:
Golgorrrath Featured By Owner Jul 26, 2010
"The Middle is also, where you have a million-and-one opportunities to really screw up your story for good. Opportunities that will send you spiraling into ever tightening circles that eventually jam you into a corner you can't get out of. In short: get you Lost in your own story."

I assumed the capitalized Lost was not an intentional reference to the show Lost, but if it was it's a veeery fitting example. And it if wasn;t it made me snicker anyway.
Reply
:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Jul 26, 2010  Professional Writer
LOL!
-- Oh! You caught my Pun! Two cookies for you.
"lost" is a prime example of a story that never did end up anywhere in particular.
Reply
:iconttbranwen:
TTBranwen Featured By Owner Jul 2, 2010  Hobbyist Writer
Those writers that just spit their stories out with little forethought make me a little jealous. Neil Gaiman is apparently one of those: Dave McKean said Gaiman just "puts a bunch of characters on a stage and sees what they do." And then he goes on to write awesomeness. Bastard.

Anyway, I discovered that it isn't so much "the middle" I fear as the between times between plot-points. I know a bunch of things that are going to happen in the middle, but I don't know what happens between those things, which leads to awkwardness. And something has to happen between those plot-points because important character development needs to occur, conversations need to be had, part of the world need to be revealed, etc. So this time, I'm outlining the living daylights out of my story before writing it. Well, maybe not the living daylights, but enough so I know what should happen in each chapter while leaving space for things to happen that I didn't expect to happen, but are perfect for the moment and the story anyway. At least, that's the plan. :work:
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:iconembrynstormcat:
EmbrynStormcat Featured By Owner May 13, 2011
Well, being myself the regular 'pants in the seat writer' or how did you call it (I call it writing like a reader...), those things between the plot points just come boiling up when I least need them really :-P If I need inspiration, I look at how far the exams are away... No, not really, but now that they ARE underway - very much so - I suddenly can't shut my imagination up. And the worst part of it is... If I don't write it down now, when I don't have time, I'll have forgotten it ALL when I do.
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:iconttbranwen:
TTBranwen Featured By Owner May 16, 2011  Hobbyist Writer
That stinks--I don't, luckily, tend to forget things I think of, but when I do, it really irks me. Especially when I all I can remember is that it was a really good idea, I just can't remember what it was.

But yeah, I figure out a lot of things while writing, which is handy, if difficult to predict. So it seems to have been working well for me to have the outline and then figure out the rest as I go along. Granted, I say that now, when I've been procrastinating for days because one of my characters just asked another a question, and I don't know what that other character is going to say. Rarr.
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:iconembrynstormcat:
EmbrynStormcat Featured By Owner May 19, 2011
very recognizable... =P
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:icongolgorrrath:
Golgorrrath Featured By Owner Jul 26, 2010
And apparently Terry Pratchett does that too. In the interview in the back of my copy of Good Omens, Gaiman describes how Pratchett forced himself to write 500 words a night, and he heard that one night Pratcheet finished with 200 words still to go. So he just started the next story.
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:iconttbranwen:
TTBranwen Featured By Owner Jul 26, 2010  Hobbyist Writer
Ha! :laughing: I guess that's why they worked so well together on Good Omens then. I have a copy of that; I wonder if I just failed as a fan and didn't read it or if my copy doesn't have that interview.... I'll go check later.
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:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Jul 2, 2010  Professional Writer
Those writers that just spit their stories out with little forethought make me a little jealous.
-- They make me a LOT jealous.

Anyway, I discovered that it isn't so much "the middle" I fear as the between times between plot-points.
-- Oh yeah, those can be pretty damned scary too!

So this time, I'm outlining the living daylights out of my story before writing it. ...enough so I know what should happen in each chapter while leaving space for things to happen that I didn't expect to happen, but are perfect for the moment and the story anyway. At least, that's the plan.

That's EXACTLY how I do it!
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:iconttbranwen:
TTBranwen Featured By Owner Jul 2, 2010  Hobbyist Writer
There's one author--I can't remember his name, but I know he's a he--who writes whole books with the following process: he writes the first sentence without any idea of an actual story arc or characters and he'll make that sentence as beautiful as he can; when it's as beautiful as possible he writes another sentence and makes that one as beautiful as he can before moving on to the NEXT sentence. The whole time he doesn't really know what's going to "happen next," he just goes from gorgeous sentence to gorgeous sentence and stops when it feels finished. True story; he's a favorite author of a friend of mine. And apparently sometimes people yell at him that you can't possibly write a decent book that way, but the guy's written a bunch of extremely well-reviewed novels, so apparently it works for him. Freak of nature that he is.

I think trying to write a coherent book like that would actually kill me. :giggle:
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:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Jul 2, 2010  Professional Writer
That definitely sounds like a freak of nature to me!
-- I do it the same way Edgar Allen Poe does it --- I plan it out within an inch of it's life, then put the plans aside and write vaguely along those lines (from memory) until I get to where I wanted to end up. *grin*

As long as I know the end and the central climactic scene, I can finish it.
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:iconttbranwen:
TTBranwen Featured By Owner Jul 3, 2010  Hobbyist Writer
I think I'll end up referring to my outline as I write--and to all the pages and pages of world-building stuff I wrote up. Otherwise I'll forget little details that I loved in the planning process and then be all upset that I forgot them and the story suffered for it. But I'm very good at diverging from an outline when I need to, so I'm not worried about being too dependent on the outline.

(Huge pet peeve of mine: people who say they can't write outlines because if they have an outline then they "have" to stick to it, and then that screws up their writing. :fork: )
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:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2010  Professional Writer
I have a VERY well-trained memory. OCD has it's uses. *wink*

(Huge pet peeve of mine: people who say they can't write outlines because if they have an outline then they "have" to stick to it, and then that screws up their writing.

Gods, that's a peeve of mine too! It's obviously an excuse to cover the fact that they're just too damned Lazy to write one.
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:iconttbranwen:
TTBranwen Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2010  Hobbyist Writer
I think it's also a handy excuse for why their stories and essays never work out well: they didn't plan it properly, but they can't plan it properly because when they write outlines then they have to stick to them, so really it's best if they just sit around and whine and write crappy stories and essays. Admitting immediate defeat is much easier than actually dredging up the courage to make an honest stab at writing well. Plus it gets you so much sympathy and attention.

Sigh.

:fork:
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:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2010  Professional Writer
...Too damned lazy to write an outline.

I think it's also a handy excuse for why their stories and essays never work out well...
-- I think you're Right.

Admitting immediate defeat is much easier than actually dredging up the courage to make an honest stab at writing well. Plus it gets you so much sympathy and attention.

Which is why people like me Don't argue with them. Less Competition at the publishers. They can HAVE the sympathy and attention. I'll take the Money, thank you very much. *grin*
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(1 Reply)
:iconzerorinas:
ZeroRinas Featured By Owner Jun 14, 2010  Student Writer
Interesting take. Although some seat in the pants writers would disagree lol
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:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Jun 14, 2010  Professional Writer
Some have, which is why I post that disclaimer.
-- Unfortunately, for them, just spitting whatever randomness happens to be in your head out onto the page Isn't the only way to write.
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:iconzerorinas:
ZeroRinas Featured By Owner Jun 14, 2010  Student Writer
I think they know that. As you already know, many writers have different ways. It just depends on the person.
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:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Jun 14, 2010  Professional Writer
*nods* Every writer is different. No one techniques works for everyone.
Reply
:icongaaras1girl1719:
Gaaras1Girl1719 Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
-groans!- the middle is EVIL.

Ends? Easy, and fun to finally enjoy.

Starting? Not so easy but no where near as hard as the middle. T_T

I don't know why I"ve got so much trouble with them since I always start with a sequence of events sheet, but somehow the middle stll gets to me!
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:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2010  Professional Writer
The middle gets to me because I have so MANY options, I can't seem to make up my mind.
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:iconseraphinekh:
SeraphineKH Featured By Owner Jun 13, 2012
An abundant of choices can be fatal ^^
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:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Jun 16, 2012  Professional Writer
Agreed.
-- Try writing a visual novel sometime where every decision changes the game.
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:icongaaras1girl1719:
Gaaras1Girl1719 Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Its the little tedious scenes in the midle that get to me, they're just so boaring to write that I end up with writers block. :(
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:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2010  Professional Writer
Then make something Happen: an explosion, a kidnapping, a natural disaster, a train wreck, wild hoards of rampaging fan-girls...?
Reply
:icongaaras1girl1719:
Gaaras1Girl1719 Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
LoL, already done that, it's the quiet moments between big events that are murder. ;)
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:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2010  Professional Writer
Then Skip them. Seriously, make a chapter/scene break and begin the next scene where something IS happening.
Reply
:icongaaras1girl1719:
Gaaras1Girl1719 Featured By Owner Jun 12, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I've done that, and now I've got a stack of future chapters that I can't quite use yet. T_T

I'm thinking of taking a break from updating and just writing out as many chapters as I can without posting. That way if I change my mind and get stuck again I won't be as lost as I am now.

Thanks for the help again!
Reply
:iconookamikasumi:
OokamiKasumi Featured By Owner Jun 13, 2010  Professional Writer
</i>I'm thinking of taking a break from updating and just writing out as many chapters as I can without posting. That way if I change my mind and get stuck again I won't be as lost as I am now.</i>

That's actually how I do it. Since I tend to make minute adjustments every time I go back over my work, it's just easier in the long run to let a chapter or two sit before I post it. If the story is only a few chapters long, I'll wait until it's finished and post it all in one shot.
Reply
:iconbladedmako:
BladedMako Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2010
I LOVE the middle, man. It's the BEGGINING I can't stand.

Let's write a story!

Alright, what's the first sentence going to be?

...
...
...

ARGHHHH!!!! I HATE THAT!!!
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